Vitamin B12 synthesis exposed

Nguyễn Thế Long

Senior Member
Vitamin B12 synthesis exposed

Researchers observe an unusual enzyme and mechanism of action in the final steps of making B12

[Published 21st March 2007 05:01 PM GMT]


Scientists have worked out the final steps of vitamin B12 biosynthesis, which involve the unusual transformation of one vitamin -- a flavin -- into another, according to a report in this week's Nature.

The results provide the finishing touches to scientists' understanding of the synthesis of this complex molecule. Vitamin B12 "has played a role in fascinating chemists and biochemists for 50 years," A.I. Scott, of Texas A&M University, who peer-reviewed the paper for Nature, told The Scientist. "Nature put this beautiful cofactor in front of us and it's fascinating to realize step by step how the whole thing was built. It's like detective work," added Scott, who was not involved in the research.

Vitamin B12, the only vitamin synthesized exclusively by microorganisms, is approximately three times larger than all other vitamins, requiring about 30 enzyme steps for its synthesis. Until now, the final stages of how it is made have eluded scientists, primarily due to the difficulty of isolating each of the many complicated steps.

Study author Graham Walker, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, told The Scientist that he did not intend to study vitamin B12, and instead focused his work on the bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, and how it managed to live inside plant cells and fix nitrogen. In experiments using bacteria with a mutant gene called bluB, his group noticed that the bacteria were not behaving as expected. It turns out, the bacteria were not synthesizing B12; the mutation had impaired their ability to form the last ligand of the vitamin, known as 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB).

Michiko Taga, first author on the paper (also based at MIT), began searching for the genes that might be playing a role in the final stages of B12 synthesis, assuming that BluB was one of several proteins working to create DMB. "You can't tell by genetics that a protein can function alone or in a pathway,"Taga told The Scientist. "We thought that BluB would be on the pathway because the reaction seemed too complex [for it] to be working alone."

But Taga didn't find any other proteins in the pathway. So she joined forces with an old friend from her undergraduate days, Nicholas Larson of Harvard Medical School, to crystallize B12. The structure revealed an unusual mechanism: The BluB enzyme formed DMB by using oxygen to dismantle another vitamin co-factor -- flavin mononucleotide, sometimes used by other enzymes as an electron shuttle. Specifically, the researchers showed that BluB has evolved into a closed "box" shape that traps the flavin, then uses oxygen to destroy and remold it into DMB.

"One still has to marvel at how such a small enzyme is able to perform this catalysis which involves the breaking and making of so many carbon-carbon bonds," Martin Warren at the University of Kent, and who was not involved in the research, told The Scientist in an Email. It is particularly remarkable, he added, considering this action includes "the surgical excision of a carbon from a six-membered ring to generate a five-membered ring."

The researchers report a similar "cannibalism" action in the synthesis of vitamin H, but note that the unique structure and action of BluB suggest it belongs to a new class of enzymes called the "flavin destructase" family.

Walker said his lab continues to examine B12 in rhizobia and what evolutionary forces have favored production of B12, considering it's such a costly compound, energy-wise. He added that he suspects that the oxidative stress placed on bacterial organisms living inside eukaryotic cells may have induced the unusual mechanism described in the paper. Scott noted that many anaerobic bacteria do not have the BluB protein, suggesting that there is still much to be discovered.

Andrea Gawrylewski
mail@the-scientist.com

Links within this article

M Taga et al, "BluB cannibalizes flavin to form the lower ligand of vitamin B12," Nature 446:449-453, March 22, 2007.
http://www.Nature.com/index.html

A.I. Scott
http://www.chem.tamu.edu/faculty/faculty_detail.php?ID=56

ML Phillips, "Vitamin A receptor found," The Scientist, January 25, 2007.
http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/43512/

Graham Walker
http://web.mit.edu/biology/www/facultyareas/facresearch/walker.html

D. Bruce, "The genome of Sinorhizobium meliloti," The Scientist, July 31, 2001.
http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/19808/

GRO Campbell, et all, "Sinorhizobium meliloti blub is necessary for production of 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole, the lower ligand of B12," Proc Natl Acad Sci, 103:4634-4639, 2006.
http://www.the-scientist.com/pubmed/16537439

Martin Warren
http://www.kent.ac.uk/bio/warren

S. Blackman, "Rooting out the cheats," The Scientist, September 4, 2003.
http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/21566
 
Vitamin B12 synthesis exposed

Cơ chế tổng hợp Vitamin B12

Researchers observe an unusual enzyme and mechanism of action in the final steps of making B12

Các nhà nghiên cứu quan sát 1 loại enzim khác thường và cơ chế hoạt động của nó vào những giai đoạn cuối của quá trình tổng hợp Vitamin B12
?
Scientists have worked out the final steps of vitamin B12 biosynthesis, which involve the unusual transformation of one vitamin -- a flavin -- into another, according to a report in this week's Nature.

Theo 1 bản báo cảo trên tạp chí Nature thì các nhà khoa học đã tìm ra những bước cuối cùng của quá trình tổng hợp sinh học Vitamin B12, bao gồm sự biến đổi bất thường của 1 loại Vitamin – 1 flavin – sang 1 loại khác.

The results provide the finishing touches to scientists' understanding of the synthesis of this complex molecule. Vitamin B12 "has played a role in fascinating chemists and biochemists for 50 years," A.I. Scott, of Texas A&M University, who peer-reviewed the paper for Nature, told The Scientist. "Nature put this beautiful cofactor in front of us and it's fascinating to realize step by step how the whole thing was built. It's like detective work," added Scott, who was not involved in the research.

Các kết quả này là những bước tiếp cận cuối cùng để các nhà khoa học hiểu về quá trình tổng hợp của phân tử phức tạp này. Vitamin B12 “như đã thôi miên các nhà hóa học và hóa sinh học trong suốt 50 năm,” A.I. Scott, thuộc trường đại học Texas A&M, ngưỡi phụ trách chuyên môn về bài viết này, nhưng không tham gia vào nghiên cứu, nói với The Scientist. “Tự nhiên đã đặt cofactor tuyệt vời này trước mắt chúng ra và thật là lý thú khi từng bước hiểu được quá trình hình thành cả phân tử hoàn chỉnh. Nó giống như 1 hành trình khám phá vậy,” Scott nói thêm.

Vitamin B12, the only vitamin synthesized exclusively by microorganisms, is approximately three times larger than all other vitamins, requiring about 30 enzyme steps for its synthesis. Until now, the final stages of how it is made have eluded scientists, primarily due to the difficulty of isolating each of the many complicated steps.

Vitamin B12, loại vitamin duy nhất ?được tổng hợp chuyên biệt bởi các vi sinh vật, có kích thước lớn gấp khoảng 3 lần các loại Vitamin khác, cần khoảng 30 enzim cho quá trình tổng hợp. Cho đến giờ, các giai đoạn tổng hợp cuối cùng đã vượt quá tầm hiểu biết của các nhà khoa học, khó khăn chủ yếu là việc đơn lập từng bước trong 1 tổng thể rất phức tạp gồm nhiều bước.

Study author Graham Walker, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, told The Scientist that he did not intend to study vitamin B12, and instead focused his work on the bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, and how it managed to live inside plant cells and fix nitrogen. In experiments using bacteria with a mutant gene called bluB, his group noticed that the bacteria were not behaving as expected. It turns out, the bacteria were not synthesizing B12; the mutation had impaired their ability to form the last ligand of the vitamin, known as 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB).

Tác giả Graham Walker, thuộc học viện công nghệ Massachusetts(MIT), nói với The Scientist rằng ông ấy không chủ định nghiên cứu về Vitamin B12, mà chú tâm vào công việc nghiên cứu của mình trên loài vi khuẩn Sinorhizobium meliloti, cách nó sống trong tế bào thực vật và cố định Nito. Với các thí nghiệm sử dụng vi khuẩn với 1 gen đột biến kí hiệu ?bluB, nhóm của ông ấy đã phát hiện ra vi khuẩn này có biểu hiện khác thường. Hóa ra, vi khuẩn này đã không tổng hợp B12; đột biến này đã làm suy yếu khả năng của chúng tạo ra những vật chất cuối cùng ( 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole ? (DMB) ) cấu thành nên Vitamin B12.

Michiko Taga, first author on the paper (also based at MIT), began searching for the genes that might be playing a role in the final stages of B12 synthesis, assuming that BluB was one of several proteins working to create DMB. "You can't tell by genetics that a protein can function alone or in a pathway,"Taga told The Scientist. "We thought that BluB would be on the pathway because the reaction seemed too complex [for it] to be working alone."

Michiko Taga, người đầu tiên nghiên cứu dựa trên thuyết này - đã bắt tay vào công cuộc tìm kiếm̀ các gen có thể tham gia vào những giai đoạn cuối cùng của việc tổng hợp B12, và bà công nhận BluB là 1 trong 1 vài protein góp phần tạo nên DMB. “Trên cơ sở di truyền học, không thể ?khẳng định được 1 protein hoạt động đơn độc hay trong 1 chuỗi ,” Taga nói với The Scientist. “Chúng tôi nghĩ rằng BluB chỉ nằm trong 1 chuỗi ?bởi vì phản ứng này có vẻ quá phức tạp đối với 1 mình nó.”

But Taga didn't find any other proteins in the pathway. So she joined forces with an old friend from her undergraduate days, Nicholas Larson of Harvard Medical School, to crystallize B12. The structure revealed an unusual mechanism: The BluB enzyme formed DMB by using oxygen to dismantle another vitamin co-factor -- flavin mononucleotide, sometimes used by other enzymes as an electron shuttle. Specifically, the researchers showed that BluB has evolved into a closed "box" shape that traps the flavin, then uses oxygen to destroy and remold it into DMB.

Nhưng Taga đã không tìm thấy những protein còn lại trong chuỗi. Nên bà ấy đã cộng tác với 1 người bạn cũ từ hồi còn học đại học, Nicholas Larson thuộc trường Y khoa Harvard để kết tinh B12. Cấu trúc thu được đã cho thấy 1 cơ chế khác thường: Enzim BluB này tạo nên DMB bằng cách sử dụng Oxy để tháo bỏ các cofactor Vitamin khác – flavin mononucleotide, vốn thường được sử dụng bởi những emzyme khác như 1 con thoi electron. Đạc biệt, họ đã chỉ ra rằng phân tử BluB này đã phát triển thành hình 1 cái “hộp” đóng giam flavin, sau đó sử dụng Oxy để đập vỡ rồi ráp lại thành DMB.

"One still has to marvel at how such a small enzyme is able to perform this catalysis which involves the breaking and making of so many carbon-carbon bonds," Martin Warren at the University of Kent, and who was not involved in the research, told The Scientist in an Email. It is particularly remarkable, he added, considering this action includes "the surgical excision of a carbon from a six-membered ring to generate a five-membered ring."

“Điều còn thắc mắc là sao 1 enzyme nhỏ bé lại có thể tạo nên 1 xúc tác mạnh mẽ đến thế bao gồm cả việc phá vỡ và tổng hợp từ rất nhiều mạch cacbon-cacbon,” Martin Warren thuộc đại học Kent, không có trong nhóm nghiên cứu, nói với The Scientist qua 1 bức thư điện tử. Ông ấy cũng công nhận rằng bước " cắt bỏ 1 cacbon biếǹ 1 vòng 6C sang 1 vòng 5C” trong phản ứng này là̀ đặc biệt quan trọng.

The researchers report a similar "cannibalism" action in the synthesis of vitamin H, but note that the unique structure and action of BluB suggest it belongs to a new class of enzymes called the "flavin destructase" family.

Các nhà nghiên cứu cũng đã công bố 1 phản ứng “ăn thịt đồng loại” tương tự trong quá trình tổng hợp Vitamin H, nhưng cần chú ý rằng cấu trúc và hành động khác thườ̀ng của BluB thể hiện rằng nó thuộc về 1 nhóm enzim mới được gọi là họ “flavin phá hủy”.

Walker said his lab continues to examine B12 in rhizobia and what evolutionary forces have favored production of B12, considering it's such a costly compound, energy-wise. He added that he suspects that the oxidative stress placed on bacterial organisms living inside eukaryotic cells may have induced the unusual mechanism described in the paper. Scott noted that many anaerobic bacteria do not have the BluB protein, suggesting that there is still much to be discovered.

Walker nói rằng phòng thí nghiệm của anh ấy sẽ vẫn tiếp tục nghiên cứu B12 trong vi khuẩn nốt sần và những nhóm tiến hóa nào giúp tổng hợp B12, bởi vì đó là 1 hợp chất đắt tiền, giàu năng lượng. Anh ấy nói thêm về nghi vấn của mình rằng tác động oxi hóa dựa vào các loài vi khuẩn sống trong các tế bào nhân thực có thể đã gây ra ?cơ chế khác thường được mô tả trong bài viết. Scott lưu ý rằng có rất nhiều vi khuẩn kị khí không có protein BluB, cho thấy vẫn còn rất nhiều điều phải khám phá.

Andrea Gawrylewski
mail@the-scientist.com

Links within this article

M Taga et al, "BluB cannibalizes flavin to form the lower ligand of vitamin B12," Nature 446:449-453, March 22, 2007.
http://www.Nature.com/index.html

A.I. Scott
http://www.chem.tamu.edu/faculty/faculty_detail.php?ID=56

ML Phillips, "Vitamin A receptor found," The Scientist, January 25, 2007.
http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/43512/

Graham Walker
http://web.mit.edu/biology/www/facultyareas/facresearch/walker.html

D. Bruce, "The genome of Sinorhizobium meliloti," The Scientist, July 31, 2001.
http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/19808/

GRO Campbell, et all, "Sinorhizobium meliloti blub is necessary for production of 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole, the lower ligand of B12," Proc Natl Acad Sci, 103:4634-4639, 2006.
http://www.the-scientist.com/pubmed/16537439

Martin Warren
http://www.kent.ac.uk/bio/warren

S. Blackman, "Rooting out the cheats," The Scientist, September 4, 2003.
http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/21566
 

Facebook

Thống kê diễn đàn

Threads
11,651
Messages
71,556
Members
56,293
Latest member
infor.sv888
Back
Top